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What Is Your Why?

“Do you live for the applause? Live the way that you cheer and scream for me.” – Lady Gaga, Applause

Why do you do it? Why do you get out of bed every morning at 5am and head to the gym? Why do you spend your lunch hour at the gym? Why do you stop at the gym on the way home from work? Why do you get up on the weekends and make your way to the gym instead of sleeping in for a few hours?

Why do you tolerate the fish oil burps and drink Hard Apple Cider instead of Guinness? Why do you opt for grass fed beef patties with farm fresh veggies over the convenience of a $5 pizza or frozen meal?

You need to know your why. There will be days when you won’t want to do it. But you need to know your why and in those times you need to remember why you work as hard as you do. Why you push yourself to your limits and then go past them. Why you take care of your body so that it will take care of you for a long time.

Knowing your why will be very important as working out becomes a part of your life. Remembering your why will be integral as you take on the challenge of the workouts every day. When you are in the middle of that tough workout and you want to quit – and you will want to quit – you need to remember why you push yourself to do the things you do. Remember them. And then use them to drive you forward to that next rep, that next minute, that next round.

Why do I do it? I have no ambitions to ever make it to the CrossFit Games. I am of the age that I could compete in the Masters Division. I admire all of those woman, and all of them would quite handedly kick my butt.

I have 3 young kids, and I would like to teach them to take some chances in life. Show them it’s OK to show up and participate and compete even if you have no chance of winning. Show them that even when we think we are failing, we aren’t. As long as we are trying our hardest and learning something each time, we are not failing. Teach them the value of competition, sportsmanship, camaraderie, and hard work. To show them how to take chances.

I would also like to get over myself and my fear of feeling inadequate. To actually push myself harder than I think I can. To challenge myself physically and mentally. The applause I am seeking is only from inside myself at doing something I didn’t think I could.

Why do you do it? Is it for the thrill of competition? Is it just to say that you did it? Is it to prove to yourself and maybe others that you can? Is it to be in the ring with others simply to support and cheer them on? Is it to set a good example for your kids? Is it simply for the love of working out?

What is your why?

It’s the Little Things

My life has changed a lot this past year. Maybe it was turning 41. I was completely prepared to turn 40, it didn’t bother me, but I never looked past that to realize I would keep aging and things didn’t stop at 40. Turning 41 was much harder for me than I expected. Maybe it was realizing my oldest only has a few years of high school left and will be driving soon. Maybe it was realizing that my “baby” is in third grade and growing more and more independent. Maybe it was realizing my middle son will be in high school soon.

This past year I have learned to do and appreciate the little things. Life isn’t about all these really big huge, life altering events. It’s all about the little stuff. Holding the door open for someone. Smiling at people. Holding hands with someone you care about.

It’s also about the little changes we can make in our lives that have profound affects. Cutting out sugary coffee drinks was one that I did. I also decided to stick to Zone eating for longer than a month. It was a big change the first time I did Zone, but after I got used to it, it became an easy thing to do. Sticking to it really was a small change. I am eating anyway, why not just be sure it’s a healthy, balanced meal. Over the course of 6 months, I even ended losing some weight I had been carrying around since my first child was born almost 16 years ago.

I also took a look at some of my weaknesses in the gym. My list included a lot of bodyweight movements, specifically shoulder-intensive movements. Pull ups, push ups, dips, and handstands were high on my list of weaknesses, and something I never thought I could do or even wanted to do, a muscle up. I know many of you see me at the gym every day doing a couple reps of each of those. I can’t spend hours working on those things each day, my muscles fatigue far too quickly for that. But I can spend a few minutes every day working on those things. And a few minutes a day adds up to an hour a week, and an hour a week adds up to several hours a months. And after 3 months of doing those things, my strength and confidence have greatly improved!

We need to do these things with our mindset as well. Find many small bits of happiness each day rather than looking for a giant event. Smile at small children, notice the way the fresh air smells, appreciate the beauty in nature, compliment a stranger, buy a cup of coffee for a co-worker. You will surely find yourself feeling good after those things. It would be great if we could get flowers delivered to our desk or a raise at work every day, but those are special things that need to remain special because of their scarcity. In between those times, you need to find happiness in the little things.

There are certainly a series of big events in everyone’s lives – weddings, home buying, children, deaths, career changes and more, but we need to focus on living a happy daily life. Enjoy your cup of coffee in the morning. Relax for a few minutes before bed and read something for pleasure. Celebrate things at the gym – getting that first double under, finishing under the time cap, pushing yourself hard in a workout, smiling while suffering, offering encouragement to others. These are the things that will truly bring you happiness on a day to day basis.

Practice taking time each and every day to focus on something positive. To find something you enjoy. If you can’t, bring joy to someone else – their smile will be contagious. Life is tough. No one gets out alive anyway, as they say.

Taking Control

We started taking gymnastics classes again this week. We had taken them a few years ago when we first opened the gym (and we were coaching all of the classes all day every day 7 days a week.) It has been a few years, but we decided it was time once again to work on some of our weaknesses. At 6′ and 6’4″ you can imagine that gymnastics aren’t something we are built for or that comes naturally for either of us.

So, that is why we do personal training with a gymnastics coach. I was a bit nervous to be honest, it had been a long time and I wasn’t sure what I would retain. Turns out, it’s much like riding a bike. It didn’t take long to get back into it and get upside down again.

But here’s the funny thing that happened. Previously when we went and were working on handstands, I didn’t have either the strength or confidence or knowledge or control that I needed to be successful. I was nervous about getting to that inverted position and so I just flung myself as hard and fast as I could. It’s hard to stop where you need to this way. But this time around instead of panicking and flinging myself upside down, I focused on strength and control.

And you know what? Something amazing happened! I was able to be slow and steady and controlled and find my center of gravity to be able to stick and hold a handstand position. And then you know what happened? The Coach challenged me to try handstand walks.

Now this is something was never even on my list of things I wanted to accomplish someday. I just always thought handstand walks were something I would never be strong enough or coordinated enough to do. I thought I was too tall and my shoulders were too weak and there were other things I would work on. And then I slowly kicked up under control, found my balance point and took 4 steps!

We can take control of things in our lives in this same way – small and large. Slow and steady and under control and we have the power to look at situations in a better light. Life does not always go the way we planned. We can work to control what we can, and work to control the way to think about and react to the things we can’t control.

This change in mindset is huge! It isn’t easy to put this into practice every day, and it is something that you need to work on each day. You may even need to find a coach of some sort to help. If you can control your thoughts and reactions to things, you have gained control of everything in your life!

Double Unders Tips and Tricks

Double unders got you all twisted with whip marks all over your body? They are definitely one of those movements that you can’t out-strength your way into mastering. They take time and patience and are a skill to learn.

They can be super frustrating because you can’t just pick up a rope and will your way to getting them. You also can’t just spend hours at a time working on them until you get them (trust me, I have tried that.) Your best plan of attack is a few minutes every day. Time and patience, my friends, time and patience.

When I first started CrossFit I was lucky enough to get them pretty quickly. When I workout came up with double unders, I was able to double-single-double-single my way through. I remember the first time the gym I was at did Annie (50-40-30-20-10 Double Unders and Sit Ups). I was the only woman at the time to complete it, with a time of 13:19. I could do the double unders, but they certainly weren’t efficient or fast.

From there, I never really got better at them. In fact, I just got worse. Until I could barely do them at all. I was super frustrated and vowed that summer to finally master them. I sat out in my drive way with my jump rope every night for weeks. I watched all sorts of videos, tried all sorts of techniques, tried all sorts of jump ropes, and tried all sorts of different lengths of the jump rope. I was just waiting and hoping that at some point, it would all finally click.

It never really did just magically click one day. But over time I was able to string some double unders together and then finally work to improve my consistency, speed, and efficiency.

I have struggled immensely with double unders. And now I am pretty good at helping other people get theirs. Only because I have tried and failed and tried some more, do I understand where people are at and how to get those first amazing successful double unders.

So, I have some tips and tricks for you. I see a lot of the same mistakes as I Coach athletes on these.

1. The rope movement comes from the wrist, not the shoulders. Your shoulders will get too tired too quickly. You also won’t be able to keep the rope pulling through fast enough if you aren’t spinning through your wrists.

2. We all have a strong hand and a weak hand. Try a split rope (a jump rope cut in half.) This is a great tool to work on the rope rhythm and timing of the jump without the frustration of missing all the time. You will also be able to see that one hand has it all figured out, the other one doesn’t have a clue. I try to keep my weak hand more neutral, and have my strong hand do the majority of the work in spinning the rope.

3. Keep your elbows tucked to your hips. The goal is for the rope to hit the floor each time it passes under your feet. We get excited and our arms come up and then the rope gets shorter and we are more likely to miss because we aren’t jumping high enough. One way to do that is to pick a spot a few feet in front of you on the floor and aim the rope to hit that each time.

4. Jump through your ankles, not your knees. Double unders happen super fast, the rope is spinning and you have to be able to jump fast enough to get over that rope. But you also have to prepare for the next double under, so you have to be able to rebound fast enough as well so you can keep going and string them together. Keep your knees straight and jump through your ankles. It’s less energy expenditure and faster jumps.

5. Stay on your toes. Again, you have to jump fast and rebound fast for that next rep. Keep on your toes. If you left your heels touch the ground and your weight shift, you then have to re-shift your weight – and that takes more time than that double under will allow.

The first goal is to get a few reps, even if they are double-single-double-single. The next goal is to string a few together. Don’t take too much time with that added single in between – it will only reinforce that muscle memory and make stringing them together more difficult. Then, you want to work on making the double unders consistent. Then you can work on making them more efficient.

Also remember that double unders when you are fresh are often easier. Once you get tired, things often fall apart. So be sure to be practicing them when tired. Once fatigued, you will see where the technique starts to break down.

Try these tips and tricks and see how your double unders go!

Row Row Row Your Boat – The Benefits of Rowing!

I like rowing. As a 6 foot tall female CrossFitter, it’s one of the very few movements whereI have an advantage over smaller athletes (the other 2 being wall balls and box jumps.)

Rowing is a lot like running – any one can strap on a pair of shoes and run. Anyone can strap into a rower and row. But there are certainly ways to be a more efficient rower (just like there is good form and technique to be an excellent runner.)

Rowing is a full body exercise and it keeps the heart rate elevated. Unlike a bike, which only has resistance in one direction, rowing has resistance in both directions (forward and back) making you much stronger and increasing the rate at which you burn calories.

Unlike running, which can often lead to overuse and joint issues, the rower is low impact. It’s a very natural movement and there is minimal stress applied to any part of the body. 

Did you know that the rowing movement activates over 90% of the body’s musculature AND promotes the strengthening of the smaller stabilizing muscles throughout the abdomen, back, and hips?

Strength and stability in these areas helps athletes maintain proper form and technique in all of the varied movements we do in CrossFit. Having these muscles fine-tuned can help maintain higher paces and stronger power outputs for longer periods of time.

Plus, if you’re maybe looking to drop a few pounds, rowing delivers great bang for your buck in terms of energy expenditure. Since rowing involves muscles throughout the body, caloric expenditure rises quickly.

During maximal 6-minute efforts, athletes have recorded caloric expenditures of 36 cal/min. While this may be achievable in other sports, keep in mind that the the full-body nature of rowing means you’re burning more calories at any given effort level.

Another benefit? Those monitors don’t lie. They hold you accountable for every single stroke. Unlike a barbell lift or a box jump where you don’t get to see the actual output of your efforts, the rowing monitor will know if you gave it your all that stroke or not. You can use this to your advantage to train for other movements though – the rower teaches you not only how to pace yourself, but how to go all out when you need to.

It’s getting colder in Wisconsin – which around here means we run less and row more. Much like many people need to learn to like running (or at least tolerate it), some people need to learn to love rowing. Don’t fight it – there are a lot of great advantages to that rowing machine!

The Value of a Gym Membership

Sure, you could easily spend $10 a month and have 24 access to gym equipment at a facility near you. But why do people choose to spend more on a CrossFit gym membership?

CrossFit gyms are not in the business of selling access to equipment, we are providing value through the coaching and the community. You just aren’t going to go to a 24 hour globo gym and make friends the way you do at a CrossFit gym. You don’t come to a CrossFit gym, put on head phones and isolate yourself while you do your sets of reps. Suffering through a tough workout is a very bonding experience for people.

People like the known. We like to be comfortable. If left to my own devices, it is very unlikely that I am going to tackle a workout or movements that I am not good at or don’t like doing. Having someone else tell you what to do ensures that you are going to be a more well-rounded athlete.

I also am not going to push myself as hard as I could if I was working out alone. There is definitely something to be said for having people around you doing the same workout. I am going to push myself a little harder knowing that my gym friends are right there next to me. A Coach is certainly going to help push you out of your comfort zone too, and that my friends, is where all of our personal growth happens!

Even if I finish last, those same gym friends are going to be cheering me on and pushing me to finish as strong as I can. You just don’t get that working out alone or in a building with other random people doing random exercises. In fact, if you tried to cheer other people on at a globo-gym they would probably kick you out!

You get coaching expertise. You have coaches that know what you are working on and the best way to make sure you are moving correctly to avoid injury. They also know how to coach you to make sure you are being efficient and getting the full range of motion. Sure, those other gyms have mirrors, but have you ever tried to clean a barbell while checking your form in the mirror? Doesn’t work real well…

CrossFit gyms program with your long term health and goals in mind. Maybe we have an easier day one day because we want to optimize recovery time. We’re not just randomly choosing workouts we find online and throwing them together. We have a daily, weekly, monthly, yearly, and even life-time plans!

The old cliche, “You get what you pay for” is certainly true when choosing a gym. You could pay less and go someplace else, but the value is just not there. At a CrossFit gym you aren’t paying for access to equipment, you are valuing your health, your safety, your progress, your time, your money, and the community that you develop. Thank you for valuing yourself enough to invest in your well-being!

It’s the Little Things

My life has changed a lot this past year. Maybe it was turning 41. I was completely prepared to turn 40, it didn’t bother me, but I never looked past that to realize I would keep aging and things didn’t stop at 40. Turning 41 was much harder for me than I expected. Maybe it was realizing my oldest only has a few years of high school left and will be driving soon. Maybe it was realizing that my “baby” is in third grade and growing more and more independent. Maybe it was realizing my middle son will be in high school soon.
 
This past year I have learned to do and appreciate the little things. Life isn’t about all these really big huge, life altering events. It’s all about the little stuff. Holding the door open for someone. Smiling at people. Holding hands with someone you care about.
 
It’s also about the little changes we can make in our lives that have profound affects. Cutting out sugary coffee drinks was one that I did. I also decided to stick to Zone eating for longer than a month. It was a big change the first time I did Zone, but after I got used to it, it became an easy thing to do. Sticking to it really was a small change. I am eating anyway, why not just be sure it’s a healthy, balanced meal. Over the course of 6 months, I even ended losing some weight I had been carrying around since my first child was born almost 16 years ago.
 
I also took a look at some of my weaknesses in the gym. My list included a lot of bodyweight movements, specifically shoulder-intensive movements. Pull ups, push ups, dips, and handstands were high on my list of weaknesses, and something I never thought I could do or even wanted to do, a muscle up. I know many of you see me at the gym every day doing a couple reps of each of those. I can’t spend hours working on those things each day, my muscles fatigue far too quickly for that. But I can spend a few minutes every day working on those things. And a few minutes a day adds up to an hour a week, and an hour a week adds up to several hours a months. And after 3 months of doing those things, my strength and confidence have greatly improved!
 
We need to do these things with our mindset as well. Find many small bits of happiness each day rather than looking for a giant event. Smile at small children, notice the way the fresh air smells, appreciate the beauty in nature, compliment a stranger, buy a cup of coffee for a co-worker. You will surely find yourself feeling good after those things. It would be great if we could get flowers delivered to our desk or a raise at work every day, but those are special things that need to remain special because of their scarcity. In between those times, you need to find happiness in the little things.
 
There are certainly a series of big events in everyone’s lives – weddings, home buying, children, deaths, career changes and more, but we need to focus on living a happy daily life. Enjoy your cup of coffee in the morning. Relax for a few minutes before bed and read something for pleasure. Celebrate things at the gym – getting that first double under, finishing under the time cap, pushing yourself hard in a workout, smiling while suffering, offering encouragement to others. These are the things that will truly bring you happiness on a day to day basis.
 
Practice taking time each and every day to focus on something positive. To find something you enjoy. If you can’t, bring joy to someone else – their smile will be contagious.

This isn’t a Mindfulness Article… – Written by Coach Patrick

The Big Three
Like one does, I was having a lengthy conversation with a fellow mindfulness practitioner the other day. He and I were chatting about the practice for beginners, what changes over time, and the nuances and challenges that can exist over the course of the long-term, both personally and culturally. However, this isn’t a mindfulness article, this is some of my observations during our conversation about the parallels between physical fitness and mindfulness practice.

This all got started when we were exchanging ideas we received from our mentors when we each started our practice. Generally speaking, we both came across three big tenets that lend to building a sustainable and beneficial individual practice. I realize these may change from practitioner to practitioner so these aren’t scripture, but the big three, as we discussed were: (1) consistency; (2) accountability partners; (3) monitoring attachments.

This may look eerily similar to what I or another coach might have already chatted to you about when you first set off in your personal journey through CrossFit Candyland. Regardless, it is a great reminder from which we can all benefit, so let’s jump back in and review!

 Consistency

In mindfulness and fitness alike, consistency can be the key to a make-or-break beginning. Whether it becomes a dedicated long-term practice or a fickle experiment often hinges on how well you can incorporate the act of practicing (attending a class) into your already established lifestyle.

Making the commitment to affix a fitness practice into a new routine as your routine solidifies it as an important part of your week; a part that is non-negotiable and requires your intention and attention. So often a person who jumps on and off bandwagons does so because that bandwagon never establishes itself as a key priority.

Cue the time tested ole cliche, you have to make yourself (and your fitness) a priority. This doesn’t mean large swaths of sacrifice in your life where you commit 23 hours a day being spent in the gym, it means finding a concrete time you can plan and adhere to showing up and putting your fitness in the limelight in a sustainable and pragmatic way.

 Accountability Partners

This is one area CrossFit tends to excel. We are community-based social creatures that thrive on connecting with others. Moving that lens to a fitness practice, much like mindfulness, pays off more often than not.

Finding and establishing a friend or two, a significant other, a class regular, or perhaps even an imaginary spirit animal who will promote your consistency, help you maintain your accountability, and challenge you to have fun and show up helps bridge the gap from a long and lonely slog through fitness to something that is both enjoyable and accountable.

The informal agreement struck means you’ve got a teammate, advocate, and champion on days you don’t want to be there or be consistent; similarly when your accountability partner is having an off day, you are there to return the favor.

You also have a built-in outlet to share the experiences, the WODs, and the “suck” that can exist in getting better over time. It isn’t always rainbows and snow-cones, but you’ve got someone who has your back through the good, the bad, and the ugly of it all.

 Monitor Attachments

Simply put, be aware of your judgments and the values/meanings you attach to them. In Western culture, we place such a massive emphasis on performance and success that so often we are immediately concerned about how we did. In mindfulness the act of doing is more important than “doing the best.”

In fact, not to get too Yoda on anyone, but in mindfulness there really isn’t or at least shouldn’t be a judgement on how well or poor your practice was. I realize that sounds like heresy in the fitness world of Western humanity, so I won’t tell you to absolve yourself from all judgments.

However I have seen countless times somebody who minimizes a success and maximizes a frustration. Yes, we all have things we are trying to improve in CrossFit and we also have things we do well. That is less important to me for the long-term success of a fitness practice than what we attach to those strengths and weaknesses.

 Drink from the well that nourishes you. If you choose to ascribe frustration, failure, disappointment, and not good enough attitudes to your efforts, you will continue to find those same things reflected back at you. Likewise, if you choose to appreciate, celebrate, and learn from the peaks and valleys of your efforts, you will more often than not feel the returns of a nourished commitment to yourself.
Increasing your fitness isn’t always easy, but it is always worth it. As with mindfulness or any new endeavor, choices made in the beginning can either stack the deck in your favor or make it a rougher road from the get-go. Choose wisely.

Just Breathe… – Written by Coach Patrick

If you’ve been around me more than a few minutes, you’ve undoubtedly heard me say things like “take a big brace breath” or “breathe in your nose, out your mouth.” This is not some New Age guru-esque attempt at getting you to channel your inner fire breather or spirit animal; breath work is integral in tons of life’s applications, especially with fitness.

Not all breathing is created equal when it comes to the type of task or demands you are performing. So let’s take a deep breath and jump right into the concept of breath work as it plays out in the gym…

The heavy stuff… 
When we are weightlifting, we generally have two phases we are moving back and forth between our reps: eccentric and concentric. Fancy words aside, here’s an example to follow along with the back squat.

As we prepare to squat down, we are in the eccentric phase. Before the squat, we need to make sure to take a nice, big breath in, but we aren’t breathing for the sake of breathing.

For any lift, we are wanting to have structural integrity, rigidity, and stabilization of our body while it is performed. This breath “braces” or pressurizes our system to keep a solid body position and rigid form throughout the lift. As we squat we maintain that tightness of our back, midline, and torso.

We hit the bottom of the squat and drive out of the hole to rise back to a standing position; this is the concentric phase. At this time we can exhale, but it should be an exhalation that is timed with your exertion. What I mean by that is we aren’t blowing all of our air out like it is a fog horn and then promptly become a mushy mess trying to not collapse under the weight of the barbell.

The exhalation should be controlled, forceful but shallow, and consistent, one that maintains tension as you rise without blowing everything out all at once.

Bones and muscles alone aren’t enough to have the full array of efficiency and stability in the body for any lift. We need to reinforce them with breath that promotes tension, contraction, and pressurization of our soft, squishy bits. This will look and feel different from lift to lift. For example, our strict press focuses on keeping the butt and abs tight (not sucked in), where our midline as a whole unit is strengthened, keeping our ribcage down and our torso lean back minimized.

For a deadlift we are wanting an engaged posterior chain, back and lats being contracted, and yes, midline stabilized. What you’ll notice is midline stabilization is crucial, and that bracing breath before the lift should, at a very minimum, seek to reinforce and tighten up the midline.

All lifts should be treated as full body lifts: consider everything from foot placement to midline stability regardless of whether it is a squatting, pushing, pulling, or <insert your favorite verb> . Our safest and best attempt in any lift (gainz, as they say on the street) requires an understanding of how our breath will ultimately help or hinder the rest of the system.
The gas tank stuff…
Intense training leads to soulless, gas tank emptying, open throes of out-of-breath despair. While that may not change, what will change over time is your level of capacity and recovery during and after those bouts of intense, earth-shattering WODs.

Your brain may freak out and cordially inform the rest of your body that you are dying and in need of desperate attempts at fast, shallow breathing. Don’t listen to your reptilian brain, it’s an old, silly creature. If you need to recover quickly during or after a WOD, slow, big deep breaths in your nose and out of your mouth are key.

This limits the amount of recycled CO2 you are breathing and promotes as much oxygen grabbing as you can while also telling your body the threat is over, heart rates can normalize, life can go on, the sabertooth didn’t kill us.

We’ve all been the victim of the death gasp breathing post WOD, the quicker we can consciously shift to the deeper, more controlled cyclical breathing through the nose and out of the mouth, the more rapidly we’ll get back to badass status instead of badass-on-your-back status.

This is a tiny piece of mountains of research and continuing study. I won’t geek out on it forever but it’s always worth keeping in mind since it is a cornerstone of performance and recovery.
Breathing. Do it right, and as Aladdin says, it’s a whole new world.

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Be sure to register for our Breathing Workshop on Saturday, May 27th from 11:30am – 1:00pm. Just in time for Memorial Day “Murph”!

CrossFit Masters Course

We will be hosting the CrossFit Masters Course at the gym the weekend before the Games start – July 29-30, 2017.

The purpose of this course is to learn specific methods for teaching CrossFit to adults 40 years of age and beyond. Participants learn how to assess the training needs of masters athletes, whether they’re training for wellness or competition, and adapt the CrossFit program accordingly.

The effects of aging are explained in detail, with a view to understanding the difference between sedentary aging, which leads to a myriad of negative life outcomes, and active aging, which can be associated with greater longevity and quality of life.

Masters athletes are an ever-growing part of the CrossFit community and can be challenging to coach, particularly for the trainer with limited experience with older athletes. This course presents a practical method for applying the CrossFit methodology to a masters athlete and takes into account how age, fitness, injury state and competitive orientation interact to create different coaching challenges and scenarios.

Masters competition is becoming increasingly popular, and regardless of whether the participant is an athlete or the coach of an athlete, the course provides essential information for understanding the demands of masters competition and how to program and train for optimal performance while minimizing age-related risks. Participants should come prepared to participate in lectures, small-group training sessions and workouts. Peers and instructors provide coaching, evaluation and feedback in interactive lectures and group work.

https://crossfit.regfox.com/mastersmadisonjuly2017